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Exclusive First-Look Photos: Outerlimits SV50

Despite missing their move-in deadline for last month’s Miami International Boat Show (Read the story), Mike Fiore and his crew from Outerlimits Offshore Powerboats in Bristol, R.I., did manage to get the first SV 50 V-bottom to the show’s in-water display at Sea Isle Marina on Saturday, Feb. 16. The boat is powered by a pair of Mercury Racing 1350 engines.

Fiore, the owner and founder of the custom high-performance V-bottom and catamaran company, took several images of the low-profile 50-footer—the first one completed—at the docks. According to Fiore, this is the first time his photos have been published.

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On its first trial, the new Outerlimits SV 50 reportedly reached 140 mph. All photos courtesy Mike Fiore/Outerlimits.

“It was awesome,” Fiore said in a telephone interview this afternoon. “The boat came right off the trailer and ran perfectly. It was hard to get a good run on the Intracoastal, but it ran 140 mph pretty easily. Without thinking about it too hard, it’s a 145-mph boat.

“The owner took it on the Miami Boat Show poker run the following weekend and it ran flawlessly,” he added.

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The low-profile, sit-down 50-footer is based on the stepped hull of the stand-up SL 52.

In addition to the boat’s owner and Fiore, Erik Christiansen and Mike Griffiths of Mercury Racing were on board for the first sea trial.

“The Mercury guys were nice enough to meet us at the docks and run the boat with us,” said Fiore. “The support we get from Mercury is just outstanding.”

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Fiore said he is most impressed with the SV 50’s fit and finish.

Currently under construction, the second SV 50 also will be powered by twin Mercury Racing 1350 engines. The boat is scheduled to be completed by summer.

Fiore said that what impresses him most about the first model, in addition to its performance, are its fit and finish.

“I love the finish on it,” he said. “As you build more boats, you get better at engineering so they go together better. At the end of the day, great fit and finish are by-products of better engineering.”

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